ThinkWithGoogle: Building a YouTube Content Strategy: Lessons From Google BrandLab

Mobile, video, and programmatic. These are all top of mind for brands. But where does content development fit in? Kim Larson, global director of Google BrandLab, shares how her team helps marketers improve and streamline their YouTube marketing strategies and feed the proverbial content monster.

Read Full Article.

Presented By

ThinkWithGoogle

As the director of Google BrandLab, where we help marketers think digital-first, there are three words that rule my day, every day: mobile, video, and programmatic. With Mary Meeker predicting that, by 2017, 74% of all internet traffic will be video, and with mobile watch time on YouTube already surpassing desktop in 2015,1 the time for brands to make sense of what mobile means for their video content strategy is now.

At Google BrandLab, we get two primary questions from marketers about how they can keep up with the ever-increasing demand for video in this mobile revolution: “What video content should I make to best engage my audience while staying true to my brand?” and “How can I create that video content at scale?” In Part 1 of our “Lessons from Google BrandLab” series, I’ll answer both of these questions by taking you through two frameworks we use every day at the Lab.

What types of YouTube videos should I make?

To answer this question, we start with a Venn diagram. The first circle represents what the brand’s target audience cares about; the second represents what the brand stands for. To get to this kind of thinking, we ask folks in BrandLab to think about:

  • “What’s truly unique and different about our brand?”
  • “What’s truly ownable for our brand?”
  • “What right does our brand have to play (and win) in this content space versus our competition?”

Once the answers are in the Venn diagram, the overlapping circles provide a window into the sweet spot for developing a video content strategy:

Sweet Spot: Where Brands and Their Audiences Intersect

Think With Google

As you consider what your audience cares about, think about the micro-moments they might be experiencing. Micro-moments are the I-want-to-goI-want-to-doI-want-to-buy, or I-want-to-know moments when people are turning to devices to find answers, discover new things, or make decisions. Johnson & Johnson Consumer, for example, took these kinds of moments into consideration as it built its video content strategy for CLEAN & CLEAR®. The brand had always been about teen friendships, and the team’s research showed that teen girls were turning to YouTube in moments when they needed inspiration, community, and support, so CLEAN & CLEAR® built a channelaround the confidence-boosting mission SEE THE REAL ME®.

How can I create online video and other branded content at scale?

Here’s the hard truth: There’s no way a brand can create all the content needed to feed consumers’ voracious appetite for video, especially on mobile devices. There isn’t enough time, money, or resources. The trick is to create content gradually and build an engaging library over time. That might sound daunting with a traditional production mind-set as a reference point. But to produce at scale requires rethinking that production process, and getting a little help while you’re at it.

Think With Google

That’s where the Create, Collaborate, Curate—or what we like to call “CCC”—content framework comes in. The idea is to use this framework to “feed the content monster,” so that content creation—video production, specifically—no longer feels like a barrier to entry into the video marketplace. As we take you through each “C” in the framework, we’ll share examples of how one brand, Mountain Dew, is using CCC to streamline its video creation and engage the mobile audience.

Create

The first type of content in the CCC framework is created by the brand. It feels like the brand, captures the brand’s tone, and offers a more traditional creative polish. It tells a story about the brand that’s entertaining, educational, or inspiring. “Create” content might simply be entertaining video that gets people’s attention, or it might deliver on the specific micro-moments we talked about earlier, such as how-to content in an I-want-to-do moment.

Mountain Dew®, for example, released an extended version of the team’s Kickstart™ “Come Alive” spot on YouTube, entertaining audiences with a longer, more interactive story than television allowed. But the brand team didn’t stop there. They worked with our Art, Copy & Code team on the firstUnskippable Labs experiment to figure out how to improve the video for mobile viewers and make it undeniably “unskippable” content people would choose to watch.

“Rather than using video exclusively as a storytelling mechanism, think of it as a tool for storymaking, in which consumers get to take part.”

Collaborate

This content is the product of the brand’s collaboration with digital influencers. It’s often content that features a YouTube creator and is produced and promoted in partnership with the creator’s channel. Ultimately, the goal of “Collaborate” content is to help brands broaden their relevance and connect with a uniquely engaged fan base while leveraging the expertise of experienced creators.

Devinsupertramp, for example, has more than 3 million subscribers on YouTube. Mountain Dew partnered with him to create a series of stunt videosfor #DEWroadtrip. They cross-posted the videos on both Devin’s channel and Mountain Dew’s channel to engage Devin’s audience.

Curate

The third and final content type is crafted by consumers and is the product of an audience call-to-action. Rather than using video exclusively as a storytellingmechanism, think of it as a tool for storymaking, in which consumers get to take part.

Audience participation keeps your message authentic and relatable and can be gathered across social channels. And consumers want to interact with brands: According to brandshare 2014, 87% of people feel they should be able to communicate, share opinions, and interact with brands in real time. Mountain Dew got the message and made fan stories a critical part of its content strategy with the “Art of Dew” video series.

Don’t overthink your YouTube content marketing strategy

You already know why you should be prioritizing online video: because consumers are. As Mary Meeker pointed out in May, more than half of mobile data traffic is already from video.2 Consumers turn to devices in all kinds of micro-moments; they’re flipping to YouTube to help them feel entertained, complete tasks, and make purchase decisions. And yet, Meeker also says advertisers aren’t putting their money where consumers are. Even though mobile commands about a quarter of media time, it only accounts for about 8% of ad dollars.2

Where’s the disconnect? I suspect it’s twofold, actually. First, I don’t think brand marketers are sure what content to make. And second, they aren’t sure how to make it. Don’t waste time overcomplicating it: Video is what consumers want on mobile. Make more of it with a little help from the Venn diagram exercise and the CCC framework.

Measuring the Impact of Online Video on Brand Metrics

PRESENTED BY:

Think with Google

THE RUNDOWN

Engagement metrics show how people react to online videos, but brand metrics prove they move the needle on brand objectives such as awareness, perception, and interest. Google’s Brand Lift solution reveals these insights about YouTube ads in near real time so you can optimize on the fly.

Is the money we’re putting into online video making an impact?

Online video is undeniably one of the key areas of focus for marketers in 2015, as well as for the next few years, because spending on desktop online video alone is projected to grow 21% every year until 2019. But as that spend increases, so does the need for brand advertisers to justify budgets and answer questions such as the one above. You need to know that video is an effective way to connect with your audiences—and that its impact can be measured.

For online video platforms such as YouTube, engagement metrics (for instance, views, likes, shares, comments, and watch time) provide a basic barometer showing how an audience responds to videos. These metrics are important because they help to inform strategies as well as the content of the video ads. The result—hopefully—is quality content that the audience finds useful, entertaining, and shareable. Creating things that an audience likes is only part of the job, though. The effectiveness of an ad campaign is also evaluated by how it affects brand metrics such as awareness, perception, and audience interest.

Gaining insight into these metrics has been tricky, however. In the past, you’d put money into a campaign and get feedback in the form of clicks and views. But you could never really be sure about its brand impact without expensive, time-consuming testing, and sometimes those results wouldn’t come in until the campaign was over. When it comes to YouTube ads, that’s no longer the case: Google’s Brand Lift solution allows you to gather brand metrics about YouTube ads in a matter of days. Advertisers across a variety of verticals have used the tool to test and optimize their online video content.

Here we present the results of different meta-analyses that show how YouTube ads are performing for advertisers and what that means for how you should rethink measuring your online video campaigns.

NEAR REAL-TIME DATA SHOWS THE IMPACT OF YOUTUBE ADS

Quick access to information about brand metrics can shift the way you perceive video content. That’s because you can now tell whether the audience likes the content (with engagement metrics) and if it’s making an impact (with brand metrics). Most important, if the content fails to measure up, finding that out in near real time means you can react and optimize quickly to get the most out of your online video spend.

After analyzing around 50 campaigns from Fortune 100 brands and category leaders running on Google Preferred (some of YouTube’s most popular channels), we found that 94% of the campaigns drove a significant lift—an average of 80%—in ad recall. We also found that 65% of Google Preferred ads saw an increase in brand awareness, with an average lift of 17%. This is particularly impressive considering that the brands in the study were already well-known.

94% of campaigns drove lift in ad recall

We also measured YouTube’s impact on what we call “brand interest,” or interest in a brand as measured by an increase in organic searches for it on Google. YouTube proved effective here as well. Looking at over 800 Brand Lift studies, we found that 65% of YouTube TrueView campaigns drove a significant lift in brand interest, with an average lift of 13%.

Together, these numbers tell a compelling story: YouTube campaigns are driving brand impact. So let’s talk about three ways you can put that information to use.

1. TEST YOUR CREATIVE

Faster collection of brand metrics offers great opportunities to test your video campaign, determine what works, and fix what doesn’t before burning through too much of your media budget. For instance, when you A/B test your campaigns, you can analyze the results by version to see which creative executions are most effective at driving brand lift.

Mondelez International launches Trident Unlimited

Mondelez International did this for the launch of Trident Unlimited. The agency produced two versions of the same spot: In the first version, the actor put gum in his mouth at the start of the commercial, and in the other he was already chewing the gum. Which one resonated? A Brand Lift study let Mondelez know that the second version had a 5% higher recall rate. And, after optimizing budget behind that version, recall rose to 97%. “Brand Lift delivered quickly,” says Leonardo Carbonell, the agency’s paid media director. “It was good to optimize the campaign while it was running.”

Having access to this kind of data in near real time means advertisers such as Mondelez can optimize on the fly and make sure their campaigns truly resonate.

2. OPTIMIZE AND REFINE YOUR DEMOGRAPHIC TARGETING

Brand metrics also help you optimize to ensure that you’re reaching the most appropriate audience. Digital platforms such as YouTube allow you to target your video ads. Then data from Brand Lift can inform you about the age ranges and genders that are most affected by your campaign.

This is great for brands that begin at a broad level with their targeting; they can now see which subset the ad performs best with and use that information to refine their targeting and increase their spend where it will be most effective.

Nissan Canada created TrueView ads for Micra model launch

Nissan Canada, for instance, created two TrueView ads for the launch of its Micra model in July 2014. One of the ads featured actor Jim Parsons, while the other was a standard brand video. A Brand Lift study was able to confirm that both ads were effective at driving awareness lift and that one ad was much more successful at increasing ad recall. But the most important finding might have been that the ads resonated strongly with women ages 25–34 and 45–54. At that point, the brand had an ad that was proven effective, a more specific demographic on which to focus the spend, and a platform to get the ad in front of the target audience. For Nissan, it was a winning combination.

3. PRIORITIZE THE METRICS THAT MATTER MOST

Every campaign is measured differently, so your path to success won’t always be the same. A campaign that’s optimized for ad recall may look different than one that’s optimized for brand interest or view-through rate. Different metric priorities can lend themselves to distinct creative best practices. Even within Google, we’ve seen a case study for this.

“We tested seven videos for a recent campaign where our goal was to drive brand metrics,” said YouTube’s Global Media Lead Maria Chai. “Because we hadn’t been able to get real-time brand signals, we looked at view-through rates as a proxy for the creative’s ability to move brand measures. Although view-through rate can be a great metric for assessing whether the creative holds the user’s attention, we learned that videos with higher view-through rates don’t always correlate to a lift in brand metrics. Getting this insight in near real time allowed us to optimize our creative rotation quickly before we fully ramped up the campaign.”

The three takeaways above represent a new mind-set for brand advertisers’ approach to online video, where measuring brand metrics in near real time is instrumental in driving more effective brand spend. This approach ensures that you’re measuring what matters most: how your content and your media dollars are moving the needle on brand metrics such as awareness, ad recall, and brand interest.