YouTube Insights, Q2 2014

Presented by:

Think with Google

 

 

 

THE RUNDOWN

Passions and interests drive people’s lives and, of course, their purchases. In this issue of YouTube Insights, see how brands like Turkish Airlines and Unilever have leveraged this behavior to create even bigger fans. Then check out how Nike and Samsung have connected with consumers on one particular passion—soccer—in some of the most popular ads this quarter. And see how your brand can turn insights into results with compelling content that speaks to consumers’ passions.

View YouTube Insights, Q2 2014: How Passions Drive Interests .

View Full Article “YouTube Insights, Q2 2014.”

The Creative Shortlist: Connecting the Global Community

presented by:

Think with Google

 

 

THE RUNDOWN

The Creative Shortlist is a new series that looks at the trends and themes informing innovative digital campaigns. This month we spotlight truly global campaigns—creative ideas that are so big, so fundamentally human, that they inspire people around the world to share, connect and come together.

VOICE OF THE MONTH

See what Creative Sandbox campaigns we’re talking about.
This edition’s guest curator is Ben Malbon, director of creative partnerships, Google.

Language barriers. Vastly different time zones. The pain of managing multiple agencies. Egos. Control. Cultural nuances. Brands have plenty of reasons to shy away from big “global” campaigns, but if you’re able to find the right ideas and execute them well, they can be worth the slog.

Global moments like the upcoming 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil—which it’s safe to say will be the most connected sporting event in history (it’s currently the fourth most searched event on Google Trends)—offer tantalizing opportunities for brands willing to take the plunge. The world won’t just be watching and partying and shouting at the screen. They’ll be on their smartphones and tablets, creating massive digital and social energy spikes. Smart brands will both fuel and harness that energy.

Take Coca-Cola. It kicked off its “The World’s Cup” campaign back in April. The centerpiece, “One World, One Game,” developed by Wieden + Kennedy, uses a new roll-over Engagement Ad to showcase five digital films about football players from very different parts of the world. In featuring these deeply personal, yet universally relevant stories in one place, Coca-Cola benefits from both the power of an individual story and the connective tissue: the triumphs and ambitions that make us human.

These kind of global campaigns are about more than brands exercising their creative and media muscles. They’re tapping a world itching to connect, to be part of something bigger and more meaningful. They’re on the forefront of something big—connecting people by building on human truths that can cross geographic boundaries (joy, peace, understanding, justice, love, loss, and so much more).

Some ideas have life beyond their own backyard, and brands can use the web to spread their big creative ideas across borders. Here are four strong examples from the Creative Sandbox gallery of brands that are reaching the world through their digital campaigns:

#1 Coca-Cola: The Happiness Flag

A crowd-sourced mosaic flag unites football fans around the world

#2 Manchester United/Google+: Front Row

A Hangout to bring faraway football fans to Old Trafford

#3 Burberry: Burberry Kisses

A letter sent to loved ones around the world, sealed with your digital kiss

#4 Embratur – Brazilian Tourism Board: The World Meets in Brazil

An interactive tour introducing World Cup fans to Brazil

When Millennials Take Charge…

Photo Credit: www.newmuseum.org

Most of us have witnessed the older generations’ struggle in learning to effectively manage Generation Y. However, a growing trend arising as the millennial generation continues to enter the workforce is young Millennials managing older Boomer generation employees.

We’ve stumbled upon one blog that attacks the issue by offering guidelines for Millennials having trouble managing Boomers.

GUIDELINES FOR THE MILLENNIAL

  • · Respect Boomers’ experience and use it. Ask them about the history of projects and relationships. Rely on their expertise.
  • · Don’t worry about being talked down to. It’s hard for me to type that, but I’m sure that Boomers probably come across as patronizing when addressing a Millennial boss. The Boomer’s generation valued experience and time on the job. That won’t change overnight.
  • · Prove you can learn. Engage a Boomer as a confidante or mentor in his or her area of expertise. Lead by learning.
  • · Use your natural collaborative tendencies and engage Boomers as fellow teammates. Help them work together. Your understanding of teamwork is very different from theirs.
  • · Don’t assume their way is like yours. My part-time Millennial staffer just accused me of trying to make something harder than it needs to be. I won’t admit to TRYING to make it harder, but that was the effect. The Millennial is right.

GUIDELINES FOR THE BOOMER

  • · Let go of your ego. Think about all the performance reviews you don’t have to deal with because you’re NOT the boss. Think about how much better you can sleep at night, because the Millennial boss has the problems.
  • · Stop parenting. If you want to give advice, ask permission first. Something along the line of “Is it OK if I share with you what I’m thinking?” Or “Do you want to hear how I would handle that?”
  • · Don’t dig in your heels and refuse to change. Business and life are about constant change these days. Deal with it. Solve problems rather than create them.
  • · Offer the benefit of your experience, but do so in private. This is similar to “stop parenting.” Don’t embarrass your Millennial boss by correcting him, based on your experience, in front of others. You may be right, but spectators will think you’re a fill-in-the-blank. And it isn’t good.

Read the full article here.